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Thread: Use of hoods during the day to create more contrast

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  1. #1

    Use of hoods during the day to create more contrast

    Has anyone ever considered creating some kind of hood to mount above the DS-500 so that it is shaded, creating more of a contrast when flashing during the day?

    This seems to me to be the reason why streetlights and schoolbus (amber and red) lights have semi-round hoods on top. The flashing red stands out a lot more when the light is shaded from the sun.

  2. #2
    ???
    May work------try it...and post videos

  3. #3
    I decided to try today. Used a leftover fender flap made by SKS.

    See next post for link to pictures ("To be able to post links or images your post count must be 2 or greater. You currently have 1 posts.").

    Quick glance would seem to indicate that it is slightly more effective on a bright sunny day (more contrast between on and off modes).

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  5. #5
    Thanks for the photos? Do you have any comments on the results?

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    I'm curious if on the DS-500 on any of the pre-programmed daylight settings that are non-hazardous on a clear sunny day in more direct sunlight, yetwhen out being used on such a day but in shadows of cover, can be dangerous? Granted, most people don't have someone they know tailing them, but perhaps doing one's own observations, feedback of other users of the road/paths, etc.

    I'm not too incredibly worried about it, but this light is said to be down right dangerous at night on some of its daylight modes (which is not the same as in shadows) and a few people have stated in their opinion they are not incredibly convenient to change from one setting to another (though that term is relative) maybe like at a stop light or briefly in under 15 seconds or so.

    I admittedly haven't done enough reading of the manual and I'm not entirely certain it's easy to gather how easy it is to change light settings solely from a manual. The manual is quite detailed though.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by David View Post
    I'm curious if on the DS-500 on any of the pre-programmed daylight settings that are non-hazardous on a clear sunny day in more direct sunlight, yetwhen out being used on such a day but in shadows of cover, can be dangerous? Granted, most people don't have someone they know tailing them, but perhaps doing one's own observations, feedback of other users of the road/paths, etc.

    I'm not too incredibly worried about it, but this light is said to be down right dangerous at night on some of its daylight modes (which is not the same as in shadows) and a few people have stated in their opinion they are not incredibly convenient to change from one setting to another (though that term is relative) maybe like at a stop light or briefly in under 15 seconds or so.

    I admittedly haven't done enough reading of the manual and I'm not entirely certain it's easy to gather how easy it is to change light settings solely from a manual. The manual is quite detailed though.
    Hey David! All good questions! I can give you my own experiences with the light, but maybe some other folks can chime in as well. With regard to riding in and out of shadows on a clear day, I don't believe it will be anywhere near dangerous, even using the highest power flash mode (EMS mode). EMS is short for Emergency Medical Services, since I modeled the timing and flash pattern after some Ambulance observations.

    Changing from one flash mode to the next is extremely simple. There are six total flash patterns available, each of which can be customized or re-defined as needed by the user. Once you turn the light on into flashing mode, it always comes back on in the last used flash mode. From there, a single click moves to the next mode in the sequence. Basically it's just a circular loop. So if you're in EMS mode, 6 more clicks will cycle through each flash mode and back to EMS mode. I find it very easy to reach back while riding and change flash modes if need be. You can easily glance back and see the mode you're in due to the amount of light being projected through the side of the lens cover.

    In steady mode, it's a little different with single clicks moving up by one power level and a longer press moving down one power level. The light will flash when you've reach either end, to let you know you can't go any further.

    I'd say as soon as the sun sets, or any time you're in dusk conditions, you'll want to at least drop down to the Level 3 on/off flash mode, or maybe the triple pulse night mode. At night, the lowest pulse mode (toggling between Level 1 and Level 2) is really good.

    Definitely take a look at the users manual as it has a LOT more info. Also note that all of the lights shipping now have the modified firmware that changes the Superlock turn-on sequence to be much more user friendly (double click vs. triple click and slower time requirements).

  8. #8
    David, it's hard to say what's dangerous versus simply an inconvenience to drivers. My friends have told me that the highest setting on overcast days is a little too bright.

    That being said, if it's overcast and visibility is reduced because of rain, I still have it cranked up. That's the only way I feel conformable taking a lane in traffic under those conditions.

    A shady patch of road on a sunny day should be fine. Yes, the light will be especially bright under those circumstances, but I personally want the extra visibility. There are lots of places along the hilly routes where I live. A rider without a bright light can all too easily blend into the shade.

    In short, err on the side of being visible. If in doubt, changing the setting at a light takes but a few seconds.

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